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Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Split in the Wall of Winter Ice, 1962; conté crayon on paper, Overall: 12 1/2 x 18 3/8 in. (31.8 x 46.7 cm) Frame: 20 3/4 x 26 3/4 in. (52.7 x 67.9 cm); The Charles Rand Penney Collection of Work by Charles E. Burchfield, 1994

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Split in the Wall of Winter Ice, 1962; conté crayon on paper, Overall: 12 1/2 x 18 3/8 in. (31.8 x 46.7 cm) Frame: 20 3/4 x 26 3/4 in. (52.7 x 67.9 cm); The Charles Rand Penney Collection of Work by Charles E. Burchfield, 1994

In 1962, this season transition was an “idea note for a painting not yet started” that was inspired by the Don Quixote-like novel by Belgian author Charles de Coster (1827-1879). Burchfield wrote how it illustrated an aspect of: “‘The Legend of the Glorious Adventures of Tyll Ulenspiegel,’ which contained an allegory representing the eternal struggle between Lucifer, the light-bringer or Spring, and Winter.  The ‘Split in the Wall of Winter Ice’ is the beginning of the end for Winter.” — Nancy Weekly