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Edith Lunt Small (1931–2017), The Entry of Christ Into Manhattan, 1982; acrylic on board, 72 1/2 x 49 1/4 x 2 inches(framed); Gift of the Artist

Edith Lunt Small (1931–2017), The Entry of Christ Into Manhattan, 1982; acrylic on board, 72 1/2 x 49 1/4 x 2 inches(framed); Gift of the Artist

For the exhibition, Edith Lunt Small, Retrospective, presented at the NTID Dyer Arts Center at the Rochester Institute of Technology in 2008, the artist stated: 

“The Entry of Christ into Manhattan,” modeled after James Ensor’s “Entry of Christ into Brussels [in1889]” has to do with irony, depicting Christ making his way up Park Avenue ignored by everyone. Most of the subjects in this work were friends (Charles Penney and Sylvia Davis), relatives (my mother and sister are both depicted, and I am the one coming out of a manhole), celebrities (Divine and Andy Warhol), homeless people, and animals on their way to the slaughterhouse to feel our insatiable need for meat. Irony is very important in my own work and in the works I love."

Object Segments

  • James Ensor , Entry of Christ into Brussels (In the Collection of The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles CA), 1889

    James Ensor , Entry of Christ into Brussels (In the Collection of The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles CA), 1889