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Screening  |  TELEVISION BECOMING UNGLUED

A Book Launch and Screening with Kathy High, Sherry Miller Hocking and Mona Jimenez

Saturday, June 13, 2015, 7–9 pm

TELEVISION BECOMING UNGLUED

A Book Launch and Screening with Kathy High, Sherry Miller Hocking and Mona Jimenez

This event is free and open to the public. 

In collaboration with Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP), the Burchfield Penney Art Center is pleased to host a public program and the Western New York book launch for THE EMERGENCE OF VIDEO PROCESSING TOOLS (Intellect, 2014), edited by Kathy High, Sherry Miller Hocking and Mona Jimenez. An investigation of the pioneering and collaborative work of media artists and technologists during the late 1960s and '70s, the two volume text features contributions from engineers, artists, historians and theorists, and provides a context for both the culture and the counterculture that drove the invention of production tools and inspired subsequent generations of contemporary artists. Throughout the book are links to the Upstate NY community, where activities occurred in spaces such as the Experimental Television Center (ETC) that housed an elaborate system designed for artists to produce videos using techniques unavailable to those outside of television studios. In addition to a conversation with the book's editors and contributors, the evening will feature screenings of video art from the compilation Experimental Television Center 1969-2009, produced by Sherry Miller Hocking, that demonstrate the use of technology discussed in the book. The compilation features work by over 100 ETC resident artists, several of which were preserved by The Standby Program and are now accessible through the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art at Cornell University. This public program will also launch Archiving the Arts, IMAP’s new web resource that documents the unique preservation challenges of artists and archivists who work with video, audio, and digital materials.

 

Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP) serves the caretakers of media collections by providing information resources to help preserve our cultural heritage. IMAP offers innovative solutions through information sharing, continuing education and networking opportunities. IMAP receives generous support from the National Endowment for the Arts, individual donors, and funds from the Media Arts Assistance Fund, a regrant program of the New York State Council on the Arts, Electronic Media and Film, with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; administered by Wave Farm. 

Biographies of the Speakers:

Kathy High is an interdisciplinary artist, educator currently working with arts and biology. In the early 1980’s she studied for her masters in film and video at University of Buffalo with media pioneers Hollis Frampton, Steina Vasulka and Tony Conrad. She has received awards including Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Rockefeller Foundation, and NEA. Her art works have been shown at Guggenheim Museum, Museum of Modern Art (NYC), Science Gallery, (Dublin), NGBK, (Berlin), Fesitval Transitio_MX (Mexico), MASS MoCA (North Adams), Videotage Art Space (Hong Kong). High is Professor of Video and New Media in the Department of Arts at Rensselaer.

Sherry Miller Hocking has worked since 1972 with the Experimental Television Center (ETC), which provided an international media arts residency program, educational opportunities and sponsorship for independent media and film artists and projects. Hocking directed the Electronic Arts Grants Program, providing funding to individuals and arts organizations. Since 1994 she has directed the Video History Project, an online research database for media scholars worldwide. She has helped organize a number of preservation conferences, notably the Video History Conference at Syracuse University.  With Kathy High and Mona Jimenez, she co-edited of The Emergence of Video Processing Tools: Television Becoming Unglued (Intellect, 2014). The archives of ETC are in the collection of the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media at Cornell University.

Mona Jimenez is an artist and educator who has been organizing and advocating for the preservation of media art and community media since the 1980s. She is an Associate Arts Professor and Associate Director in the Moving Image Archiving a Preservation Program at New York University, where she teaches collection management and the preservation of video and digital works, including time-based media art. Recent projects include developing a model for activist archiving of video collections and collaborating with colleagues in Ghana for training in audiovisual archiving and in planning a digital repository of audio and video materials.

Jeff Martin is an archivist and conservator with experience in caring for both archival collections and time-based art. He currently works as Consulting Conservator for the Kramlich Collection, a San Francisco-based collection of contemporary and media art. A 2005 graduate of New York University’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation MA program, and a 2007 post-graduate research fellow at the Smithsonian Institution’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, he served as Executive Director of Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP) for four years.

Carolyn Tennant (moderator) is a media artist, curator and historian based in Buffalo, NY. Formerly Media Arts Director for Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center (2006-2014) she currently serves as the organization's archivist. In 2007, she helped organize the Migrating Media project with other upstate New York organizations including the Experimental Television Center, Squeaky Wheel, and the Burchfield Penney Art Center. Carolyn holds a MFA from the Department of Media Study, University at Buffalo; her video work is distributed by EAI and Video Data Bank as part of the compilation Experimental Television Center, 1969-2009, and her research and writings on the history of early electronic art are included in The Emergence of Video Processing Tools. She has served on the board of Independent Media Arts Preservation since 2008.

 

Independent Media Arts Preservation (IMAP) serves the caretakers of media collections by providing information resources to help preserve our cultural heritage. IMAP offers innovative solutions through information sharing, continuing education and networking opportunities. IMAP receives generous support from the National Endowment for the Arts, individual donors, and funds from the Media Arts Assistance Fund, a regrant program of the New York State Council on the Arts, Electronic Media and Film, with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature; administered by Wave Farm.