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Felice Koenig b. 1976, Abrasion, 2010; Acrylic paint on canvas, 36 ¼ x 36 ¼ inches; Purchase, 2012

Felice Koenig b. 1976, Abrasion, 2010; Acrylic paint on canvas, 36 ¼ x 36 ¼ inches; Purchase, 2012

An Overabundance of Detail

On View Friday, February 11–Sunday, July 3, 2011

Charles Cary Rumsey Gallery   Sylvia L. Rosen Gallery for Fine Art in Craft Media  

An Overabundance of Detail features artists who create intricate aesthetic experiences in a wide variety of mediums by focusing on minute variations and fluctuations in content and form.This commitment to detail borders on obsession in some works, while in others, it reveals the unique nature of the subjects presented.  Large-scale pieces entice from afar with rich patterns, but reveal precision when examined closely.  Smaller works, because of thier tooling or reference points, can seem monumental.

This exhibition was inspired by the work of Carolyn Panzica, a sculptor who happens to work with sugar. Ted Pietrzak, former director of the Burchfield Penney Art Center, introduced her work to the curatorial staff, and asked how the architectural and sculptural qualities of cake could be addressed in an exhibition. Through collective insight we surmised that it was the intensity of detail and refinement in her art that was most fascinating.

An exploration of how the essential details of an object inform, create tension, and ultimately balance with the whole, became the motivation for the title of the exhibition, An Overabundance of Detail. Based on these qualities, a selection was made of other artists whose work can be experienced in similar ways.

An Overabundance of Detail featured artists who create intricate aesthetic experiences in a wide variety of media by focusing on minute variations and fluctuations in content and form.

Commitment to detail borders on obsession in some works, while in others, it reveals the unique nature of the subjects presented. Large scale pieces entice from afar with rich patterns, but reveal precision when examined closely. Smaller works, because of their tooling, can seem monumental.