Spirits of the Eagle, Judi Wild, 2005, 25”x38”, Watercolor and pencil with a touch of Gauche, private collection in Saudi Arabia. (Spirits of the Eagle contains 16 eagles, typical to the West coast of Canada)

Spirits of the Eagle, Judi Wild, 2005, 25”x38”, Watercolor and pencil with a touch of Gauche, private collection in Saudi Arabia. (Spirits of the Eagle contains 16 eagles, typical to the West coast of Canada)

"The Diversity of Watercolors" by Judi Wild

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

I was recently asked to respond to a blog that was written about my watercolors. The writer asked me which artist has inspired me the most. What a wonderful gift that question turned out to be. I allowed myself to flip through quite a few chapters in my life. It gave me the opportunity to reminisce over the twists & turns, which have contributed to my artistic journey.

I began using watercolors as early as age 4, which was very much a part of the English school system. In those days it was considered just as important as Math or Science. My art teachers there were wonderful mentors. 60 years later I am still fascinated by this medium & its diversity and have not deviated much, except for the occasional use of carbon pencil and gauche.

I think Glen Loates inspired me the most, especially in those early days. I was attracted to his work, because of his attention to detail and his love for animals and nature, which were so evident in his work.

He was a draftsman, as was I, before embarking on a more creative career.................thus the explanation for the devotion to detail.

When I step back from my own work, I see my watercolor paintings as precise, controlled, detailed & dry-brushed. At this point in my career I have total admiration for watercolor artist Marilyn Timms, who has achieved outstanding results using a completely different approach - almost the opposite style from my own. This proves the flexibility of watercolors. I am intrigued by her work, because I have never allowed myself that kind of freedom to loosen up, go with the flow and let the watercolors do their own magic.

Perhaps watercolors are meant to be just that - like water: fluid, alive, independent and unpredictable. We'll see how this reflection plays out in the next chapter of my creative life.

Judi Wild

 

Judi Wild was born in rural Alberta, Canada in 1945, but spent most of her childhood in England, where she was introduced to the fine art of watercolors. Her detailed artwork has been greatly influenced by her 11 years as an Alberta government draftsperson & additional 11 years spent as a graphic designer. Judi has mastered the method of applying multi-layers of watercolors using a "dry brush" technique. This gives her work that "extra" in delicate detail which she tirelessly portrays. She is represented in the National Archives of Canada, and her art is displayed world-wide in both corporate & private collections. Judi now lives in retreat on Vancouver Island where she continues with a deep connection & respect for the natural world.

 

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