Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Secluded House, 1939-42; watercolor on paper, 15 1/4 x 21 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Secluded House, 1939-42; watercolor on paper, 15 1/4 x 21 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, January 2, 1939

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Monday January 2, 1939

Dream: At a picture show all of us. We chattered and laughed so much that we were finally evicted.  When we were going up the street we discovered Arthur had picked up a fur coat of some other boy.  We considered how to return it to its owner, fearful that our reappearance in the theatre would not be tolerated.  Eventually I find my self (sic) pushing a wheelbarrow with the coat in it towards the theatre.  Bertha, trying to help walked alongside pushing down on one of the handles. Turning to her I said savagely “Will you stop that?” – and awoke.

A.M. Arthur & I taking out ashes & burning wastepaper.  It was thawing, a strong wind out the S.W. – damp & chilly.

[a second dream – following immediately on the other, Riding on a bicycle (in quest of gigantic primroses – it was late August or Sept.) down a wood-lined road to Hamburg.  Across the road were countless spider-webs, with enormous spiders with great fat bodies; I put my head down as I rode thru them – I could feel their great bodies bumping against my head and shoulders, some going down my back – I awoke horrified.

To Buffalo early to see “Sweet-hearts” – we get good center seats and enjoy the show thoroughly, when we came out the place is jammed with people waiting for seats.  Home & late lunch – afternoon spent in fussy little jobs.  B ironing some things for me.

Supper late – the B&I to Station.  According to my usual custom, I did not go to my train at once, but waited until she could get home so I could telephone her. The station was busier than I have ever seen it.

 Every time I called home, the “busy signal” which always infuriates me, was the only result.  Finally I had to give it up, but gave the call to the Red-cap who carried my bag, who at the very last moment before the train  started, came to tell me he had gotten his call thru & that B was home safe.

 I had determined on this trip not to buy any of the cheap literature I usually kill time with.  So I lay in my berth awhile thinking; chiefly, my thoughts centered around a long letter to the Telephone Co in which I told them pros & con, what I thought of the dial system.  I soon fell asleep, awoke once or twice, but remember little of the night.

Charles E. Burchfield, January 2, 1939 

 

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