Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), House and Tree in Snow, 1945; watercolor on paper, 28 1/2 x 24 1/2 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), House and Tree in Snow, 1945; watercolor on paper, 28 1/2 x 24 1/2 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

From Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, January 12, 1962

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Jan. 12 – Friday –

A brilliant sun shone from a clear blue sky, in which there were just a few elongated cirrus cloud masses. Temp. about 20° - no wind.

A.M. a little work in the studio – making an improvised table top to fit on a step-ladder stool, to be used for working on small watercolors + drawings.

About 12:00 B+I to Buffalo – To Henger’s for lunch. Then to Alling-Cory’s for paper + twine – Then to Genesee Picture Frame as to have several small w.c.’s of Mart's framed, as well as one for the Neebs. Norman Ruth was in a talkative mood and told us of old houses out near Wellsville, and also an old bachelor who lives in a huge house on Route 277 overlooking the Boston Valley – he is reported to never take a bath, and would put on a [unintelligible word] of underwear on in the fall and not change until spring, unless it wore out. He collects all manner of useless things, such as all kinds of cars, and about a dozen rural privies, and other strange objects.

Home, and called the air express to see if the amplifier had arrived. It had not; but shortly after the railway called and said the package was over there. So Bertha + I

(I forgot to say that the privies had been made by a carpenter for a customer who later refused them – they were painted all sorts of bright colors – the bachelor traded some firewood for them.  Norman also said that it was practically impossible to go into the house, as even from the doorway, the odors were frightful.)

drove over to get it, then drove to Mart’s to pay her a little visit; but she was not home.

When we got home I called Hank and asked him if he could put the amplifier [in] for me – He said he would be over in the evening. However, he came before supper and had it in in a few moments. I put on the Virgil Thompson record; and it sounded glorious – the sound fuller and clearer – what a joyful relief to have our music again!

In the evening, I wrote a letter to the Board of Directors of the Albright Art Gallery expressing our regret at not being able to attend the ceremonies on the occasion of opening the new wing, and offering our congratulations on their achievement.

Bed-time music – “Gloria” by Vivaldi – (a new record) + wonderful music, so much easier to understand than Bach’s works of a similar kind.

(Called Art to tell him the amplifier had arrived and was working well. He seemed relieved. He said they had been having below zero weather)

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, January 12, 1962

 

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