Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Illuminated letter “O”, ca. 1912; gouache on paper, 11 ¼ x 4 ¾ inches; Charles E. Burchfield Foundation Archives, Gift of the Charles E. Burchfield Foundation, 2006

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Illuminated letter “O”, ca. 1912; gouache on paper, 11 ¼ x 4 ¾ inches; Charles E. Burchfield Foundation Archives, Gift of the Charles E. Burchfield Foundation, 2006

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, February 13, 1912

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

  Tuesday February 13, 1912
     Little has happened in the past two days.  Mr. McKee left last night for the New York Boast Show and discipline – well there isn’t much.  Everyone however generally tends strictly to business.
     As I said Saturday night, I shouldn’t have even thought of getting a job in the Cost Department the disappointment being all the greater.  I didn’t get any. a job.  Mr. Bustard said only one was leaving and it was already filled which I found to be the case this evening from Pete Coy, the one who is leaving.  For a short time after I had been turned down, a dead weight seemed to bend my shoulders – the weight of shattered day dreams.  Such a thing would not last however and so I cast off all thought of it aside and became cheerful again.  And too, there may still be an opening.  “Pete” Coy said if Bustard could get rid of “Pete” Steiner diplomatically (Pete is the superintendant’s brother-in-law) he would do it, for Pete knows next to nothing I guess.
     This morning was a wonderful morning.  How I longed to take a trip to the woods!  When it became light, I looked out I saw that everything, trees, bushes posts and wires were coated white with hoarfrost, that rendered the scene weird and beautiful, with the blue sky overhead yellowing in the east.  As I went out to go to work, I examined more closely the frost on the porch posts.  Little fern like shoots jutted out everywhere with many smaller star-like formations, woven into all sorts of designs.  The frost of the tree branches was finer and fuzz like.  Trees thus coated were beautiful.  The yellow sun – just rising lit up everything.  A common place would had been transformed into a fairyland.  Down on Depot St I noticed how wonderful, an elm, naturally beautiful looked.  Every bending drooping branch was whitened with frost while the larger limbs, and trunk were black.  A row of poplars near here two was beautiful.
     Tomorrow is Valentine Day.  I only sent four - - “ugly” ones; to Joe, to Bill, to King and to Ray Williams.  I almost gave myself away by stamping them with Mullins stamping machine, the stamps of which are not unperforated like common stamps.  Of course Bill and King will know.  Joe got his this morning.   Jim at once suspected it was from one of the shops but Joe never thought of me.  I had gotten Stella Yates to type write them and he thought it was a girl friend of his who worked in a shop.  Ray also got his this morning and I believe he was somewhat sore.  Stella met me in the hall after dinner saying he had blamed her.  Shortly after I saw him go to his overcoat, take out a paper and start to put it in an envelope.  Paul, who was at the table with him demanded to see it, and as Ray showed him, I caught a glimpse of a hideous looking girl.  I at once surmised he was sending it to Stella.  I will know tomorrow for I’m sure she will show me if she gets one.
     I have been wanting to go for another trip to the woods some night, but every night seems full.  To-night I printed some invitations for Louise, to-morrow night is Esmeralda, Thursday night I will have to make some place cards for Frances’ birthday supper which takes places Friday night.  I am anxious to see if I can get a glimpse at the creatures that have been making all the tracks in the woods.

Charles E. Burchfield

 

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