Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), The Wind Harp, 1947-57; watercolor, pencil and charcoal on joined paper mounted on board, 30 x 40 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), The Wind Harp, 1947-57; watercolor, pencil and charcoal on joined paper mounted on board, 30 x 40 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield, February 13-March 2, 1966

Thursday, February 13, 2020

The show of last ten years at the Cleveland Institute — 

During all this period the demands on my time and energy created by my growing fame very trying — Like a prison; I sought all kinds of ways to escape, none effective— The two-fold dilemma of the trials of fame is excellently expressed by the following from one of the Borzoi Quarterlies “Autobiographical” “If a man publishes a book, he thereby invites publicity. If he is able to interest the public, the public will inevitably become interested in the whole truth about him—so far as that truth can be found. Such is the price of fame. If one does not wish to pay, one should avoid becoming famous—it is seldom difficult; but it is idle to aim at both being known and at being unknown.—from The Search for Good Sense
By F. L. Lucas – pg. 267 (third Quarter, 1964)

Charles E. Burchfield, February 13-March 2, 1966

 

Comments