Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Rain and Wind Thru the Trees, 1935; watercolor on paper, 20 1/2 x 29 3/4 inches; Burchfield Penney Art Center, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Armand J. Castellani, 1976

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Rain and Wind Thru the Trees, 1935; watercolor on paper, 20 1/2 x 29 3/4 inches; Burchfield Penney Art Center, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Armand J. Castellani, 1976

Charles Burchfield, Journals, August 16, 1914

Friday, August 16, 2019

Now that I am here I can not tell what is in the wind—and this is indeed its greatest charm., like the women-in-love stories. Oh the pleasure of lying on a wind buffeted hill! Hours of dreamy idleness! We scarce know when we leave it what thought we had been thinking. And it is not that we think so much as we dream, tho our dreams be vague as the haze in the air, woven perhaps from it. One who sits in the wind can never entertain low thoughts—for once, the eternal war between the spiritual & animal man is at rest—with the spiritual man supreme.
Charles Burchfield, August 16, 1914

 

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