Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Song of the Cicada, 1948; watercolor on paper, 26 1/2 x 32 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Song of the Cicada, 1948; watercolor on paper, 26 1/2 x 32 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles Burchfield, Journals, August 25, 1962

Sunday, August 25, 2019

Aug. 25 – Saturday –

The sultry weather continues; it is like a heavy blanket over the earth.

A.M. – in the studio, writing a long letter to Sally. We ate lunch under the willow tree (I went to the Hut to get sandwiches) – the goldfinch sang to us – it was pleasant under the tree – We discussed plans for a “retreat” here – so it would be possible for Bertha to lie down in the afternoon out doors. We do so much talking and so little action – I can see the advantage owners of great estates have. They have a manager and have only to say to him – this is what I want – and it is done – we have no estate, but we have the money  - if there were just someone I could say to “See a contractor and have this built-“

Daydreaming…

P.M. In studio, but not much accomplished – Studied the Spider-Web Tree, but all I did was to indicate the new place for the sun.

Late P.M.  – Called John K. – we invited him out for Monday evening – he will be leaving college next Saturday.

About 8:30 – Peggy + her cousin Kathy arrived here, after a walk across fields and the creek, for Luck’s where Hank’s sister and family were visiting. They announced their intention of going back the same way – we were rather shocked at their innocence or temerity, or whatever it might be called, and I insisted on driving them home.

Before this, Peggy had called Mrs. Luck to tell her of their plans. Before we got away, Hank called back, very angry and upset (he could hardly be blamed) Hank and Kathy’s father were waiting outside when we got there so I left them to their miseries!

Evening music – Started out with Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony (Klemperer cond.) the first side was magnificent, but when I started the second side – something seemed wrong, there was static and the needle seemed to jump from one groove to another. Inasmuch as the needle has been in use over two years, it is possible is worn too much. If so, the record is spoiled.

So the day ends in frustration!

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, August 25, 1962

 

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