Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), September Wind and Rain, 1949; watercolor on paper, 22 x 48 inches; Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), September Wind and Rain, 1949; watercolor on paper, 22 x 48 inches; Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, OH

Charles Burchfield, Journals, September 2, 1914

Monday, September 2, 2019

 A cool fresh blue windy morning. Most trees are again green & downy as in spring. A species of maple is badly rusted.

Hear powerful buoyant (sic) song of oriole. On McKinley hear fluctuating warble of yellowbird & again at noon.

Noon sultry & oppressively warm.  At Meridian a thundershower breaks. Rain has that same snowy bubbly character - comes up the street in columns of mist. We stand on front porch.

All at once at (sic) flash of lightning & a crackle of thunder that whipped thru (sic) the length & breadth of the air - the cloud is sent! The terrific cloudburst that followed was on (sic) the most stirring sights I ever saw. Our eyes were dazed yet with lightning, our ears thrummed with thunder when the air became a snowy avalanche of rain – at moments all things were blotted out in the white air, again pawing grabbing trees showed dimly - snow streaked waving masses of whitish green.

Water torrented gutters almost met in the road.

Ceased almost as suddenly as it came. The air was so clear & fresh it snapped & even hurts our eyes. Fissures in the clouds were as blinding as the sun.

Maples leaning out over the creamy-foamed gutter-rill dropped water which formed bubbles, that were blown helter-sketer (sic) over the water in a very pretty fashion to annihilation at the shore.

 Scent of patucalatum strong. Raindrops striking holes in cement walks emptied them.

 Poison puff-balls abound in our lawn. Various kinds of toad-stools.

 Very little change can be noted in town.

Wind sending ripple of white over a bending tree against a black thundercloud.

State of nature afternoon & evening one of exhaustion after the storm as a man after a free indulgence of his sexual passion.

Saw an English sparrow pursue a copper. Moon full at evening. Sky misty & soft, very light. Moon surrounded by same peculiar metallic greenish orange glow. Jupiter far in the lead tonight.

The crickets are pulsing strong tonight.

Charles E Burchfield, September 2, 1914

 

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