Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), November, 1956-61; watercolor on paper, 42 x 60 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), November, 1956-61; watercolor on paper, 42 x 60 inches; Image from the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, September 15, 1962

Tuesday, September 15, 2020

A “perfect” September day – cloudless sky – warm sunlight but pleasantly cool in the shade. Garden Mart men putting in evergreens etc.

a.m. – alone to do food shopping -
The Samples arrived about 2:00-

A very stimulating visit – they are very “alive” and sensitive to art and life –

They brought us a gift – The “La Vin Herbe” by Frank Martin-

After a long and animated conversation in the house we went out to the studio, where I showed them some of my recent work – It was a pleasure showing to them for they not only understood what I was trying to express, but were enthusiastic too –

“Orion in Winter (Should it After All be called “The Heavens Declare” and the Sunburst in “October Sunburst?) Jim said it actually seemed to be moving, which was one of the things I aimed at –

“Heat Lightning” – it was the beginning of the world

“August Sun and Corn” – Jim, “That Sun – how is it possible to make a sun glow with heat and sunlight?”

“The Sun and Queen – Anne’s Lace” Ernestine “a little girls view of a field of Queen – Anne’s Lace under a summer sun.”

“November”  Both – the contrast of Urban and Primeval Life – they admitted that rural life was in the foreground, but the enormous spruce, made it primeval.

“Thunderstorm in the Woods”  How is it possible for an artist to have so many facets?”

“Thunderstorm at Sunset” – One of the greatest –

Etc. – and I must confess I loved it – and I am glad I do!

Before they left we made a date to visit them two weeks from today –

About supper – time Hank and Tom over to do the lawn.  Hank tries to fix the tone arm on the player in the studio, but he said it looks to him as if the needles were “cork-eyed” and he could do nothing.

In the evening I played a portion of the La Vin Herbe” – It is fascinating and I think we will like it as we get acquainted, but it has to be taken in small doses – Some times it has a feeling of Sibelius –

So I turned to Beethoven’s Seventh Symphony – What a glorious flood of sound!  It is timeless – and with it is the Egmont Overture.

Charles E. Burchfield, September 15, 1962

 

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