Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), The Sphinx and the Milky Way, 1946; opaque and transparent watercolor, chalk, and crayon on wove watercolor paper, 52 5/8 x 44 3/4 inches; Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, Museum of Art, Utica, New York

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), The Sphinx and the Milky Way, 1946; opaque and transparent watercolor, chalk, and crayon on wove watercolor paper, 52 5/8 x 44 3/4 inches; Munson-Williams-Proctor Arts Institute, Museum of Art, Utica, New York

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, Vol. 20, September 17, 1914

Saturday, September 17, 2016

Evening. To Seubert’s. Pianola. Liszt’s Hungarian Fantasie is wonderful.
Heard Peter Cornelius’ “Ein Ton (Monotone). Fine. Ara V. sang, & played it. After the music had stopped the monotone part continued plainly in my ears, tho while it was being played the accompaniment took my attention.
A little of Beethoven. He was deaf. I have sound ears, pretty good eyes—all my senses are well developed even to several others not mentioned in the physiology. Yet I admit the possibility of failure sometimes. I condemn myself.
Jupiter surrounded by a white glow seen better when not looking directly at it. Where do the clouds go at night? Milky Way plain. Are they made of light? A vague misty light in the air. It is pleasant to go along this country road at night.
Music affects me more than any of the arts: painting, sculpture, poetry. It affects me almost as much as sunlight, or wind, or rain.
Charles E. Burchfield, September 17, 1914

 

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