Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), In the Deep Woods, 1918-56; watercolor on joined paper, 33 x 45 inches; Private Collection

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), In the Deep Woods, 1918-56; watercolor on joined paper, 33 x 45 inches; Private Collection

Charles Burchfield, Journals, April 2, 1931

Saturday, October 10, 2015

The Swan of Tuonela by Sibelius –

One of the most deeply moving pieces I have ever heard ―

It has the infinite sadness and melancholy that goes with absolute beauty ― It is hard to define, but as I listen to it, it stirs me in a way no music has ever done ― It has the wild sad beauty of nature in it ― I have felt the same way in the woods, especially in the spring, kneeling before a clump of new hepaticas, or when watching a spiral of dry leaves, caught up by a miniature whirlwind, eddy out of sight down some dark pine-hollow, whence comes a soft roar of distant cataracts ― It comes over me that all beauty is ephemeral ― no matter how much we would wish to imprison it, and keep it forever alive, this divine moment will pass ― it always passes, and leaves behind the banality of life ― We have no assurance that we will ever experience it again ―

Charles Burchfield, April 2, 1931

 

 

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