Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), At Anchor, 1910; pen and ink with graphite on paper, 4 5/8 x 11 3/8 inches; Burchfield Penney Art Center, Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Takats, 1976

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), At Anchor, 1910; pen and ink with graphite on paper, 4 5/8 x 11 3/8 inches; Burchfield Penney Art Center, Gift of Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Takats, 1976

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals December 1, 1910

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Thurs Dec. 1 1910.
Naturally nothing much is doing these days but school and school is nothing but study, study day after day for Bill and I at least, for we are trying be among the honor pupils in June.

This noon and letter from Jim, who is at Oberlin, was waiting for me on the Library table. I will give it here in full for it is worth it.
Oberlin, Ohio

Nov. 30, 1910

Dear Burchie,
Well I am honestly sorry but I will have to change my sentiments. On Dec. 10, 1910 four of the fellows are going to go to that beautifully city of Bellevue and I am among the number so we can not have the party. We accepted an invitation to go last June so we could hardly put it off and the 10th is the only night before Christmas we could have it. So I will have to defer the order. Everyone was willing to have you make the invitations so there is a chance that you will be given some work after Christmas. Of course it is hard luck but it cannot be helped. I will fix it up with you when I get home for that sample.

Well this is certainly a gay old town. Nothing much to do except fuss and there is plenty of that. It is very cold here and some snow but that doesn’t matter.

Thanksgiving passed swimmingly. I had the time of my life that day. We had about a nine-course dinner and yours truly had to give a toast on our girls. Believe me boy it was entirely the hit of the season. It was conspicuously being the only one without any point to it. The jokes were stale and to tell you the truth everything was somewhat bad. The jokes we hard to discover or un cover. No matter how many times you soak it, you can not drive a nail with a sponge.

I got up very nervous like when I started my speech and (oh my yes) I was for once speechless. Well that would almost shock anyone. It did shock the girls so much that one of them got electricity in her hair so bad I had to tell her to turn her switch. Then she told me not to think so much of myself I asked her “why?” and she told me that it was a waste of time to think of trifled. Well that about did me up and of course I, being a young gallant, bowed to her superior wit. She is a candidate for the Kabal because I have discriminated in her favor. Here is one of my own make ups. Why is a stuffed date like a presidential nominee? Because they are both candy dates. I know that is poor but what can you expect from one who is so very busy? Please cast this rubbish in the scrap heap and forget it. I will be home three weeks from today. As ever I am waiting for an answer.

Your Friend
Jim.

I think the last part of this letter was based of Puck, Judge, Life or some other joke-book, but then a letter is a letter even if it is full of jokes. I don’t know exactly what I answered, but I assured him that I cared not at all about the withdrawal of the order (I didn’t either – I was so crammed for time) and told him all about our parts and pastimes, putting in as many jokes as possible.

Charles E. Burchfield, December 1, 1910

 

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