Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Autumn to Winter, 1964-66; watercolor on joined paper, 50 x 75 inches; Private Collection, Image courtesy of the Burchfield Penney Archives

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Autumn to Winter, 1964-66; watercolor on joined paper, 50 x 75 inches; Private Collection, Image courtesy of the Burchfield Penney Archives

Charles Burchfield, Journals, December 10, 1964

Sunday, December 10, 2017

Last week I started on the Autumn to Winter transition. Four days spent in correction of last year’s tentative compositions — Finally started on the largest—(with misgivings on account of its size —
Even after I had made a good start, I still worried about the size — (It has now grown to 50” x 75”) – I had Bertha look at it – As usual her faith in my art, and her good sense prevailed “So what if it is larger than anything you’ve done yet? — The subject demands space and size and what you’ve done is beautiful –”
My mind is on fire now with the other three transitions – Winter-Spring, Spring to Summer and Summer to Autumn —

A note to Posterity—What I want is a circular museum, large enough to house these four season transitions and six month transitions (1) December to January – (2) February to March (3) April to May – (4) June to July – (5) August to September (6) November to December – (No. 5 already painted –)

These, with the Genesis or “And the Spirit of God” are the projected work for the next ten years or whatever time God grants to me. The long drought is ended – my mind is on fire again –
The “Winter to Spring” transition now inflames my mind and ideas crowd tumultuously upon each other –

Charles Burchfield, December 10, 1964

[When Gwathmey Siegel and Associates were working on the design for the Burchfield Penney Art Center, it was this quote that inspired our Rotunda Gallery. As the the seasonal transitions were important to Charles Burchfield, the Rotunda Gallery  became an anchor for the architects for the entire building design. It is from the rotunda element that Charles Gwathmey determined that shifting the orientation of the building - slighlty off square from the corner of the property - would make the building more dynamic.]

 

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