Charles E. Burchfield in his own words

  • Charles E. Burchfield, Journals,November, 24, 1964

    Tuesday, December 3, 2013

    Dinner at the College in honor of myself and Peter Andrews, who has donated my “December Storm”...

  • Charles Burchfield, Journals, December 2, 1947

    Monday, December 2, 2013

    A dream—Someone, (possibly the publishers) had sent me an advance copy of a new book—the world as it appeared to a child (in this case, a girl)—with many illustrations by some young artist.

  • Charles Burchfield, Journals, December 1, 1930

    Sunday, December 1, 2013

    at last I am free, and taking the snow shovel I clean pathsthe healthy vigor with which I did this, and the joy of physical exertion were such as I have not experienced for many a day.

  • Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, Vol. 33, November 30, 1919

    Saturday, November 30, 2013

    Here in this deep pine hollow where no wind ever comes; where the terrific gale in the outside world is but the vague rumour of roaring trees’ tops, indistinct because of the roar of waterfalls & the busy crackle of my fire — here there is always the peace of silentmore

  • Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, November 3, 1914

    Friday, November 29, 2013

    Our minds revert to crackling fires in fireplaces, apples, armchairs, and nutcracking. Thanksgiving & Christmas, which no longer are religious festivals but human, are in the air.

  • Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, November 29, 1930

    Thursday, November 28, 2013

    During a blizzard the night before Thanksgiving a flash of pink lightning and a clap of thunder— the wonder and mystery of nature were reborn—it is Thanksgiving morning—the storm has cleared for us...

  • Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, November 27, 1948

    Wednesday, November 27, 2013

    On all sides I saw beautiful materials, wide rolling fields of dead grass to the N.E. with great lavender cloud shadows sweeping across it

  • Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, February 12, 1937

    Tuesday, November 26, 2013

    The determination to stand alone, and the iron will to carry it thru, keeping his work pure and unsullied by the current decadence in art; by keeping lonely vigils with nature, whereby he comes to know her in all her true aspects unsoftened by sentimentality.

  • Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, November 25, 1952

    Monday, November 25, 2013

    Drive south on Bullis to the Hill—where I parked, + climbed the hill. The moon behind a “fleet” of dappled clouds. I waited for it to come clear of them—

  • Charles Burchfield, Journals, November 24, 1942

    Saturday, November 23, 2013

    ... Afterward I went to a movie to kill time. It was thoroughly stupid, and I was glad when I finally lay down in my berth and homeward bound.