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Marion Faller (1941-2014), Butter Lambs and Easter Eggs, Penney’s Dairy, Broadway Market, Buffalo, NY, Spring 1988, 1988; chromogenic color print, 16 x 20 inches; Gift of the artist

Marion Faller (1941-2014), Butter Lambs and Easter Eggs, Penney’s Dairy, Broadway Market, Buffalo, NY, Spring 1988, 1988; chromogenic color print, 16 x 20 inches; Gift of the artist

Inquisitive Lens: Marion Faller

On View Friday, October 10, 2014–Sunday, March 29, 2015

Margaret L. Wendt Gallery    R. William Doolittle Gallery   

Photographer and social documentarian Marion Faller (1941-2014) emerged from an academic tradition in photography. Her work began as formal black and white compositions of light and shadow that added to a canonical practice. Later her photography progressed into full color images that capture the hand-crafted art that people make for their homes, lawns, and porches, as well as public displays in shared spaces that reflect our unique culture. Reflecting on her work dating from 1979-2002, Faller stated: “My work is about how individuals and communities visually express their values, their interests, and their sense of what is important and beautiful. The subject matter is usually close to home— homes, yards, small businesses and community buildings such as schools or churches.”

 In documenting the ways people celebrate holidays, decorate their interior and exterior spaces, and respond to seasonal changes, Faller keenly observed what we express through artisanship as well as untrained, but motivated creativity, to reflect both seriousness and humor “either intentionally or inadvertently.” Through a medium that is communally embraced, she applied her acute sense of composition and appreciation of color to enhance our appreciation of these temporary art displays that distinguish shared experiences.

The exhibition MARION FALLER: Inquisitive Lens celebrates the evolution of her work and shares in her appreciation of the cultural diversity of community, particularly in Western New York and in her hometown of Wallington, New Jersey. Selections from the Burchfield Penney Art Center’s comprehensive collection, almost all of which was generously by the artist over a period of several years, reflects the compassionate and aesthetic range of Faller’s career. The exhibition, curated by Head of Collections Nancy Weekly, will also include some of Faller’s early collaborative work with Hollis Frampton.