Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Black Tree (Gloomy Tree), 1917; Watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper, 14 x 11 inches; Courtesy of the DC Moore Gallery, New York

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Black Tree (Gloomy Tree), 1917; Watercolor, gouache, and pencil on paper, 14 x 11 inches; Courtesy of the DC Moore Gallery, New York

From NYC: BPAC Artist-in-Residence Entry 1, October 7, 2013

Monday, October 7, 2013

Dear Nancy,

I've reflected more on why I struggled during my last AIR visit. In addition to the issues that I mentioned in my September 26th letter--the over stimulation, blue skies, July presentation--I realized that I wasn't connected deeply enough to Burchfield. It was the only time--in six visits--that I didn't delve into the archives. I was concerned about making more photographs and thought that viewing the new Evidence of Intent show would be sufficient to reaffirm and draw from my kinship with him.

But it is Burchfield's writings as much as his work that have afforded me insight into his thoughts, feelings, creative process, and inspirations. They, his letters, in particular, have illuminated the important relationships in his life and practice, and those in my life are, as you know, in part what drive my AIR work.

That said, a new image I made during my last visit (below) was surely inspired by a Burchfield work I saw this past summer at DC Moore. While I have been around the specific site of my photograph several times during past explorations in the CB Nature and Art Center's nature reserve, it was only after seeing and being very struck by the power of Black Tree (Gloomy Tree) 1917, that I was able to respond to the site viscerally, then photographically.

I suppose, ultimately, the intrinsic bond I feel with Burchfield remains constant, but my photographic process is enhanced when I am closer to him in thought and spirit. You'll be sure to find me in the archives next time. My tree, by the way, isn't black or gloomy, rather representative of a moment charged with a confluence of dynamic influences and experiences, including the introduction to Lax, for which I thank you and Tony.

Janelle

 

Janelle Lynch is the 2013 Burchfield resident artist. She has garnered international recognition over the last decade for her large-format photographs of the urban and rural landscape. Widely exhibited, her work is in several public and private collections including the Burchfield Penney, George Eastman House Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, the Newark Museum, the Fundación Vila Casas, Barcelona, and the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo, Salta, Argentina.

 

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