Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Snowstorm on Sweet Road, 1947; watercolor on paper, 28 x 40 inches; Image courtesy of the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Snowstorm on Sweet Road, 1947; watercolor on paper, 28 x 40 inches; Image courtesy of the Burchfield Penney Art Center Archives

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, February 17, 1962

Monday, February 17, 2020

Feb. 17, Saturday –

Loose clouds dawn, which soon evaporated beginning first on the northern horizon, where a broad band of clear cerulean appeared – soon the whole sky was clear, and the sun blazed forth full and strong – a fine winter day again –

In the studio, finished work on the income tax; then started stretching paper for mounting drawings.

Call from Mr. Sherlock Herrick of E. Aurora. They were just about ready to buy my “November Storm” (1950) which is at G. Contemporary Gallery [Goodman]; but they felt they might ought to see a few more before deciding. I could see their point but did not want to show them anything here. Finally, they said if they could just drop by to meet me for a few moments they would be so delighted – So it was agreed they should come at 3:00 o’clock.

In the meantime, I called John to see how it should be handled – He thought too they perhaps have more of a choice, and he thought it would not do us any harm to show them 2 or 3 things here. So, I picked out “Drought Mirage” (1950) and “Wind-Blown Timothy Field” (1954) and then thought I would show also the still untitled one about glory of god and springtime flooding a woods in late winter, started last winter.

The latter bowled over Mr. Herrick; but I think Mrs. Herrick still clung to “November Storm” - the plan now is for them to wait until I have finished the other one. Then they will try it in their home and then make a decision.

How this is to be worked out I do not know. John doesn’t want to leave Goodman out of the transaction – on the other hand it will be embarrassing to have g know I allowed them to come out, as I never have let him bring anyone out.

Before they came, Hank and David came over, H to do odd jobs of repairing  (light in the bathroom, latch on the garage door, and the knob etc. on the shed door, which in a rage, when I could not force the key in it, I battered with a hammer.

Hardly had he arrived when the Town Hall Furniture came out with my new mattress (nylon? foam mattress and springs. Before he left he changed all the springs + mattresses. Bertha took my springs; the only things to be discarded were B’s springs + my mattress. It was a great relief to have all this taken care of so soon and so speedily –

It was good to see the “November Storm” – I rather hope they do not buy it, but rather take the other; I would like to keep the Storm – I think I have never achieved such a rugged wind tortured tree, as there is in this sketch – (which was made during a violent blizzard.)

Bedtime music – Beethoven’s fifth symphony – (directed by Kemper) – wonderful playing – It was a long search to find this version – I do not know how many records I bought and had to reject – I do not see how this epoch-making symphony could be presented better than Kemper does, with it, as a bonus, is a beautifully played “Consecration of the House Overture”.

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, February 17, 1962

 

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