Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Studio Doodling, undated; conté crayon, graphite, colored pencil and crayon on paper, 11 x 17 1/4 inches (27.9 x 43.2 cm), Burchfield Penney Art Center, Gift of the Artist, 1967

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Studio Doodling, undated; conté crayon, graphite, colored pencil and crayon on paper, 11 x 17 1/4 inches (27.9 x 43.2 cm), Burchfield Penney Art Center, Gift of the Artist, 1967

Charles E. Burchfield, The Place of Drawing in the Artist's Work, 1965

Saturday, March 2, 2013

“...it occurs to me that even doodles may be referred to as a drawing of a sort. In my case, doodling is a free exercise in abstraction, unpremeditated, and not a conscious expression, since it is done at a time of some other activity. It seems to me that I have doodled all my life. I recall doodling on my mother’s Sunday tablecloth before I was grade-school age. Perhaps I was born with a doodle pencil in my hand, the left one, in the same manner that a fortunate person is said to be born with a silver spoon in his mouth. Even while making a serious drawing it is almost impossible for me to avoid doodling on the drawing at intervals.”

Written by Charles Burchfield (1893-1967) in 1965 for the publication, The Place of Drawing in an Artist's Work, published in 1968 after his death.

 

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