Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Glory of Spring (Radiant Spring), 1950; Watercolor on paper, 40 1/8 x 29 ¾ inches; Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Corning Clark, 1959

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Glory of Spring (Radiant Spring), 1950; Watercolor on paper, 40 1/8 x 29 ¾ inches; Parrish Art Museum, Southampton, New York. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Corning Clark, 1959

Charles E. Burchfield's Dreams, Journals, April 14, 1956

Sunday, April 14, 2019

April 14 – Sat.

Bertha and I on our annual Hepatica pilgrimage. A clear sunny day, ideal for our trip, mild weather with just a faint tinge of chill.

First to the Hepatica Hollow, where we tried without much success to ignore destruction of this idyllic spot but the cutting down of trees, and the resultant [unintelligible word] mess of branches etc. – Hepaticas in their prime and we chattered over them like children – Dug up the choice plants –

Then on towards the Hepatica Hill, thru Springville. It suddenly occurred to us we could use some food, so we decided to stop at West Valley Tearoom, if it were open. It proved to be, and the lady in charge said that while there was to be a wedding breakfast there, we would be welcome.

We had the plate luncheon, roast turkey etc. – and it was delicious. This place with its pine-wood walls, very attractive. At noon a cuckoo came out of a Bavarian clock to announce the time, followed by a tune on a music box.

The wedding party came before we left, so we hurried up a bit, so as to leave the place to them –

We had not gone far south when we came upon a road-block announcing a detour due to “bridge out” – so westward over a dusty road (the two young men in a convertible who dashed passed us enveloping us in dust) – South then on what will be the new 219, to 242 + then east. Here to our chagrin, we found the bridge that was out, and we would not have had to detour after all – So we had to retrace our route-

The Hepatica Hill worth all the trouble however – hundreds + hundreds of hepaticas – Dug up three more. I found a dead yellow birch I wanted to use for the Easter Morning picture, and Bertha insisted on going down to the car to get my sketch-book.

A leisurely trip homeward, by way of the new 219, from which we had to detour to Middle Road and then back to old 219 –

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, April 14, 1956

 

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