Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), The Great Elm, 1939-1941; watercolor on five pieces of paper glued together, 33 1/2 x 53 1/4 sight; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal, 44.9

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), The Great Elm, 1939-1941; watercolor on five pieces of paper glued together, 33 1/2 x 53 1/4 sight; Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh: Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal, 44.9

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, July 28-30, 1962

Sunday, July 28, 2019

July 28 – Saturday to July 30 – Monday –

The visit of Mary, Clara and Vic.

A very satisfying and heart-warming visit –
They arrived later than we expected, having gone astray after leaving the Thruway at the Seneca St. exit.
We ate at home that evening, a delicious roast ham dinner Bertha had prepared –

That evening I played for them a studio recording of Dvorak’s New World Symphony.

Sunday all of us to church – (I was ashamed of myself – I fell asleep momentarily five times) – afterwards to the Old Orchard for dinner – Home by way of Griffins Mills - *

After we all had rested, to the Richters for a cook-out picnic supper – which was most pleasant – Clara had her Polaroid camera along, and took many and varied pictures – David was prevailed upon to play [piano] just for visitors (he kept stealing side-long glances at the rest of us in the kitchen to make sure we were not watching him!) –

Monday – A visit in the studio, while Bertha prepared lunch – they proved a most appreciative audience.
For lunch we had the corn from the Great Elm farm. We all agreed this was excellent – sweet and tender –

They left about three-o’clock – we guided them to the Thru-way entrance on the Ridge Road. We waited, and as they entered the Thruway we all waved to each other – Perhaps the thought was in all our minds – it might be the last meeting for one or more of us.

Clara had confided to Bertha before they left that the foreign object taken from Vic had proven to be malignant – They “hoped” it would not return -

*Stopped at the Great Elm – one of the ladies busy in the yard – we talked about the tree; I promised to give them a photograph of my painting of it – before we left she said if we could use some corn – she said they were just picking it. She returned with a huge bag-full of it.

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, July 28-30, 1962

 

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