Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Sultry Afternoon, 1944; Watercolor, Ink and Gouache, 28 5/16 x 22 5/16 inches; The Phillips Collection

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), Sultry Afternoon, 1944; Watercolor, Ink and Gouache, 28 5/16 x 22 5/16 inches; The Phillips Collection

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, September 8, 1962

Sunday, September 8, 2019

Sept. 8, Saturday –

Cold in the morning, but by mid-afternoon rather sultry – only a few mares-tails in a deep blue sky. Cicadas very active.

The day sort of wasted, waiting for a call from John that did not come.

After lunch we went to Ulbricht’s at the Plaza to buy birthday cards for the grandchildren. Then to Central Terminal in Buffalo to get a “Time” (Art had told us “Orion in December,” had been reproduced with other paintings in connection with an article on the Johnson (Wax) collection which is to tour the world. My impression of the whole thing that it was too hastily done – a “noble gesture” as the writer said, but not thoroughly done – All of us artists should have had more important examples for such a world-wide tour.

Evening J.G. called; he wanted some “information” from me – he had sent a painting by V.G. to the Syracuse State Fair – It was priced at $850; received a $1000 Purchase Prize – He said he was confused by the double value – but took his commission on the $850 – Did he do the right thing? I assured him he had altho termed a prize it was really a sale; but the extra $150 was just “so much velvet” for her.

He said he talked to John a “couple days ago” that J. said he was coming up here soon – Which revealed to me that he had not intended to be definite about coming this week-end.

He expressed an interest in hold[ing] a “later” years drawings show, which I was expecting, but betrayed no interest in.

I put in a call to John’s apartment in N.Y. but got no answer and then was glad I didn’t because after all to let John [know] we were expecting him all this time might make him feel bad.

Felt pretty keyed up, my chest tight – but then I had the bed-time lunch Bertha fixed; and put on the Haffner Serenade of Mozart – the tea and the music, had their effect! I began to relax and feel normal again.

Have been re-reading (this time in the complete version) “To Kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee, a wonderfully human story full of horror and tragedy – One of the better books of recent years.

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, September 8, 1962

 

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