Charles E. Burchfield in his own words Share Tweet

 
Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), The Four Seasons, 1949-1960; watercolor on joined paper mounted on board, 55 7/8 X 47 7/8 inches; Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Festival of Arts Purchase Fund 1961-2-1

Charles E. Burchfield (1893-1967), The Four Seasons, 1949-1960; watercolor on joined paper mounted on board, 55 7/8 X 47 7/8 inches; Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign Festival of Arts Purchase Fund 1961-2-1

Charles E. Burchfield, Journals, September 9, 1913

Thursday, September 19, 2013

Life itself, and even love, seems rather sordid after all, in spite of all our beliefs to the con­trary. But to one who has fought hard against this tendency, what a boon is the first cold day, bringing with it as it does - energy and hope! Nothing will help along tottering ideals more than hopeful vigor and energy.

And with these comes romance. Winter was made for hard earnest working; spring was made for love-making; summer for play time; while autumn, was for romance. Romance not in the sense of love – that is left to Spring, but rather as it pertains to other things. Every little act, or thought, sight or incident sound, or natural phenomenon, has a significance, a new meaning, rendering it interesting and pre­cious, as something to be remembered.

Charles Burchfield, September 9, 1913

 

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